Category Archives: Resources

Welcome to the Grand Tour of the Terrestrial Planets

From here you can download tiny ‘leader’ KML files linking to our four tours. A paper describing them has been submitted to the Journal of Geoscience Education. It is currently accepted subject to revision. We will upload it here along with supplemental documents including lesson plans and pre-/post tests as soon as we hear whether our revision manuscript has been accepted.

Mercury

Click here

Venus

Click here

The Moon

Click here

Mars

Click here

GOOGLE PLUTO!

Thanks to the NASA New Horizons mission, we now have spectacular new surface imagery of Pluto. Click here to download a KMZ file that you can open in Google Earth. It contains the highest resolution surface imagery of Pluto from the New Horizons Flyby in 2015. Note that it is a ground overlay on Google Earth so the Google Earth ruler, terrain, atmosphere, water, sunlight, etc., should be turned off.

pluto

Canadian Rockies GigaPan-based virtual field experience

The image below links to a KMZ file (3.76 MB) that can be used as a basis for a Canadian Rockies virtual field experience (VFE). The VFE consists principally of embedded GigaPan imagery, but there are also some regular-resolution photographs and two geologic base maps, one for western Alberta, and one for eastern British Columbia. There are 85 total GigaPans in this trip, arranged in chronological order of principal themes.

Summary: The Canadian Rockies are a world-class example of a fold-and-thrust belt. The geologic story begins in the Neoproterozoic with sedimentary deposition that continued until the Cretaceous, with most exposed sedimentary rocks being Paleozoic in age. Notable in particular is the Cambrian section, which includes the soft-bodied fossils of the Burgess Shale. Deformation associated with the accretion of exotic terranes west of the Rocky Mountain Trench during the Laramide Orogeny folded, cleaved, and faulted these strata toward the Western Interior Seaway. During the Pleistocene, extensive glaciation sculpted the landscape into a classic suite of alpine glacial geomorphological features. Many glaciers still exist, and can be viewed from the excellent roadways of the Canadian national park system. Recently, episodes of catastrophic flooding have dramatically altered low-lying valley regions, especially in the Canmore and Evan Thomas area. All of these features can be seen in whole or in part using this VFE platform.

canrockiesvft

Here’s a video preview of the trip:

Questions, suggestions, critique, and comment should be directed to Callan Bentley.

Users are welcome to modify the VFE to suit their needs. If you develop any ancillary assignments or student worksheets, please share them here.